You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Flour’ tag.

 

AllPurposeFlour_BetterBatterBetter Batter is a company founded by Naomi Poe, a mom of two sons with Autism and gluten intolerance. They offer all-purpose flours, seasoned flours, cake mixes, as well as brownie and pancake mixes. Their prices are about the same as most gluten-free specialty items, but they do offer discounts and deals, so be sure to look for them when you order.

I received a box of their All-Purpose Gluten Free Flour Baking Mix as part of my Savorfull box for September.  I thought I’d try it out in my latest recipe for GFCF “Twinkies”. One thing I noticed about it was that it was silky soft in texture. Even though it has rice flour in it, the flour was not gritty at all. Another thing that is really convenient is that Ms. Poe has already added the right amount of xanthan gum into the mix, so you don’t have to buy that separately or wonder if you put in the right amount. I found that the flour cooked very well and gave the “Twinkies” a very nice, airy texture (which was exactly what I wanted).

I think this product is definitely worth checking out more fully. I will let you know if I have the opportunity to review more of their products.  In the meantime, I hope you will pay them a visit and support this mom’s company.

 

gfcf_bread

Here’s an added bonus this week – a cookbook review! I read a press review about Celeste Clevenger’s new cookbook (Celeste’s Best Gluten-Free, Allergen-Free Recipes: Over 250 Recipes Free of Gluten, Wheat, Dairy, Casein, Soy, Corn, Nuts and Yeast) and reached out to her to inquire about reviewing it. She was incredibly generous in sending not only the cookbook but also many different flours and some konjac powder for me to try out the recipes. Celeste has a daughter and nephews with multiple food sensitivities and decided to create recipes to feed her family. She has a website that you may also wish to visit.

The cookbook is excellent, especially for those of us with additional allergies above and beyond gluten and casein. One downside is that there aren’t many photos and I would really like to see what some of these recipes look like finished.  Another possible issue is that she does incorporate some unusual ingredients, like konjac powder, that may prove difficult for the average cook to find. I’ve been checking locally for konjac powder and cannot find it; but, I found out that you can order it online. Celeste’s Cookbook also contains a section on substitutions and tips for cooking and baking.

The problem was that with over 250 recipes in this cookbook – what should I choose to make first? I decided to try a bread recipe as she has several and they don’t have yeast in them, which is not allowed in my son’s diet. The bread recipe I started with (pictured above) is simply called, “Gluten Free, Yeast Free Bread.” The bread was easy to make and was surprisingly like regular bread, complete with a crunchy crust. I couldn’t believe how it rose so nicely despite being yeast-free! My husband devoured this loaf very quickly and keeps asking when I’m going to make it again. I strongly encourage you to get a copy of this great new cookbook and try the bread recipes yourself!

 

Here they are! The very GFCF Sugar Cookies that I made for the Gutzy Gear Party this weekend. This recipe is an old favorite of mine; originally printed from cookierecipe.com in 2000. The original recipe was called “Drop Sugar Cookies.” Here’s my GFCF version –

Gluten-Free, Casein-Free Sugar Cookies (Nicholas Rating = 100 Thumbs Up!)

1 cup organic vegetable shortening

1 cup canola oil

1 1/2 cups confectioners’ sugar

1 cup white sugar

2 eggs

1 tsp vanilla extract

4 1/2 cups Celeste Clevenger’s gluten-free flour mix*

1/4 tsp konjac powder

1 tsp baking soda

1 tsp cream of tartar

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

2. Cream sugars, oil, shortening. Add eggs and vanilla and beat until nearly white.

3. Add flour, konjac powder, baking soda and cream of tartar.

4. Roll into 1-inch little balls. Roll in white sugar and flatten with palm of your hand.

5. Bake for approximately 12 minutes, less if you make the cookies smaller.

*Celeste’s Gluten-Free Flour Mix = a blend of brown rice flour, white rice flour, sweet rice flour, and white bean flour.  (All flours are from Bob’s Red Mill. This recipe, found in Celeste’s Best Allergen Free Recipes for Everyday Cooking and Baking yields 5 1/2 cups of flour mix.)

GFCFcarrot_zucchini_bars

Here’s a different way to get vegetables into your picky eater…make it look like cake! This week’s recipe is GFCF Carrot Zucchini Bars and it is adapted from a recipe in Better Homes & Gardens: New Cookbook 14th Edition.  There isn’t too much sugar in these, although they have a pleasant sweet taste to them. The original recipe does call for a cream cheese-style frosting, but as you can see in the photo – I opted not to do that. My son did spot the evidence of vegetables in them immediately, and refused to try them. (I guess this is where the frosting might have been helpful to mask the veggies!) However, my husband and I tried them and thought they were very tasty.  My husband provided the rating for this recipe; he gives it 12 Thumbs Up!

Gluten-Free, Casein-Free Carrot Zucchini Bars (Husband Rating = 12 Thumbs Up)

1 1/2 cups gluten-free all-purpose flour

1/2 tsp xantham gum

1 tsp gluten-free baking powder

1/2 tsp ground ginger

1/4 tsp baking soda

2 eggs, slightly beaten

1 1/2 cups shredded carrot (about 3 medium)

1 cup shredded zucchini (about 1 medium)

3/4 cup organic brown sugar

1/2 cup raisins

1/2 cup chopped walnuts

1/2 cup canola oil

1/4 cup honey

1 tsp vanilla

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Combine flour, baking powder, ginger, and baking soda in large mixing bowl.

Add eggs, carrot, zucchini, brown sugar, walnuts, raisins, oil, honey, and vanilla. Mix until combined thoroughly.

Spread batter into an ungreased 13x9x2 inch baking pan.

Bake for about 25 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool in pan on a wire rack. Cut into squares and serve.

Yield = 24-36 bars, depending on size

How can you substitute for dairy or gluten-containing items and still stay on the GFCF diet? It’s actually easier than you think for most items. Many times when I’m trying to adapt a recipe, I find I need to either find a common substitution, or create one. This can take quite a bit of time, so I thought it would be helpful to create a resource for you to refer back to easily when you are cooking. Therefore, I’ve compiled a list of common dairy substitutions and a list of common gluten substitutions to help you stay true to the gluten-free, casein-free diet without getting too frustrated in the process!

Dairy Substitutions

Stick Butter – Willow Run Soybean Margarine by Shedd’s (if you can eat soy); OR, Ghee (clarified butter) : this doesn’t contain casein and yet has all the richness of butter; OR, Spectrum Organic Shortening (I use this when I need more than a few tablespoons); OR,                                 Coconut Oil (melts nicely, easy to scoop into a measuring cup).

Buttermilk – 1 cup milk alternative (unsweetened, unflavored) with 1 Tbsp lemon juice or apple cider vinegar

Milk – substitute 1:1 with milk alternatives like rice milk, soy milk, almond milk, or coconut milk

Yogurt – substitute 1:1 with So Delicious coconut milk yogurt or soy-based yogurt

Cream -1/4 cup soy half-n-half, mixed with ¼ cup soy margarine, melted, and ½ c unsweetened soymilk; OR, 1 cup cream of coconut

Condensed Milk – substitute 1:1 with canned coconut milk

Gluten Substitutions –

Gluten-Free Flours –      rice, sorghum, corn, amaranth, soy, almond meal, coconut flour, quinoa flour, flaxseed flour, arrowroot,millet, buckwheat, etc.

Pastas – rice pasta, corn pasta, quinoa pasta

Cereals – items made with rice, corn, or gluten-free oats and marked “gluten-free” (watch out for extra chemicals though in some mainstream cereals!)

Breads – rice cakes, corn tortillas, gluten-free bread mixes, gluten-free crackers

Oats – look for “gluten-free” certified oats (Trader Joe’s sells them)

Rice – rice doesn’t contain gluten; if you need to avoid rice, try quinoa because it is very similar in taste/texture

(Sources of information include:  Dairy-Free Cooking; GlutenFreeWorks.)

Are there any substitutions that I missed? Have one you’d like to share? Please comment below.

coconut quick bread

I adapted this fantastic breakfast bread from this recipe. Since we can no longer use even regular, gluten-free flour at our house, I’ve had to adapt some recipes even further. (Gluten-free flour is a good product, but it has rice in it and my son has had to remove rice from his diet.) So, since we really enjoyed this quick bread when I made it before with the GF Flour, I thought I’d try to make it with a combination of coconut flour and almond meal.  It worked beautifully and Nicholas and I agreed this version is even better than the previous one! Just a note – we have never made it with the glaze that is suggested in the original recipe. Please post any thoughts or comments if you try this bread and DO make the glaze!

Gluten-Free & Dairy-Free Coconut Orange Quick Bread

(Nicholas Rating = 100 Thumbs Up!) 

1 cup almond meal

1/2 cup + 1 Tbsp coconut flour

1 cup white sugar

1 tsp baking soda

1/4 tsp salt

grated zest of 1 medium orange

3/4 cup shredded unsweetened coconut

3/4 cup canned coconut milk

1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

5 large eggs

fresh squeezed juice from 1 medium orange

1. Grease one 8 x 4-inch loaf pan with cooking spray.

2. Mix almond meal, coconut flour, white sugar, baking soda, salt, orange zest and shredded unsweetened coconut in a large bowl. Use a whisk to thoroughly combine.

3. Add the coconut milk, olive oil, eggs, and orange juice and mix until well blended.

4. Using a spatula, scrape out batter into the loaf pan. Let batter set, uncovered for about 30 minutes. While batter is resting, preheat oven to 350.

5. Bake in preheated oven for 60-65 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the middle of the loaf comes out clean. Set the loaf pan on a cooling rack and let cool at least 30 minutes before removing from the pan.

6. Remove bread from pan and allow to cool on wireless rack for another 30 minutes.

7. Wrap bread in parchment or plastic and refrigerate or freeze.

pound_cake

In my mother’s family, we have an old family cake recipe that we all refer to as “Aunt Agnes Cake.” We often serve it for birthdays and special occasions. It was created by my great Aunt Agnes many years ago and was a real Southern cake, with lots of oil and fat (in this case, eggs). I have missed it since I went gluten-free, so I thought I’d try to re-create it using coconut flour. I’m happy to report that my first attempt turned out pretty well! (Nicholas thought it was pretty great too, and he’s had the original version too.)

Gluten-Free, Casein-Free Pound Cake (Nicholas Rating = 100 Thumbs Up!)

1 1/2 cups honey

1 cup vegetable oil

2 cups coconut flour

10 eggs

1 tsp vanilla

1 tsp almond extract

Preheat oven to 325. Grease and lightly dust a tube pan with flour and set aside.

Combine honey and oil in large bowl. Add eggs and flour alternately.

Mix in vanilla and almond flavorings and beat until smooth.

Pour into tube pan and bake for 50 minutes at 325 degrees. Check that the cake is done by inserting a toothpick into cake; if it comes back clean, it is ready.

Let cake sit in pan for 5 minutes before turning out onto rack to cool for another 30 minutes.  Slice and enjoy!

A few posts back, I mentioned that I really have enjoyed getting to know the many uses for Coconut Oil.  Well, I am now exploring the many benefits of Coconut Flour, too! Since Nicholas can not have rice or beans or potatoes right now, we don’t have too many options left for creating any type of baked goods.  That is, until I discovered Coconut Flour!

According to Bob’s Red Mill

Coconut flour is a delicious, healthy alternative to wheat and other grain flours. It is very high in fiber, low in digestible carbohydrates, a good source of protein and gluten-free. It lends baked goods an incomparably rich texture and a unique, natural sweetness.

It is all those things, but it is also quite tricky to work with in your recipes! I’ve been finding that it takes about 5 eggs for every 1 cup of coconut flour because it is such a dense flour.  I have found some wonderful recipes for muffins over at Comfy Belly, that I strongly encourage you to try out.  I will also be posting a pound cake recipe shortly that I made with coconut flour.

As with all the specialty flours, it’s not cheap to purchase.  I’ve started ordering mine through Amazon’s Subscribe & Save program, because it’s very reasonable.  It’s best to keep the flour in either the refrigerator or freezer so that it stays fresh.

Yes, brownies can be GFCF and they can be delicious! When we decided to convert to eating a GFCF diet, I knew that my son would be most successful if I made food that tasted good and often was similar to what his friends ate.  Not that we have to be crowd followers, but let’s face it – peer pressure is a tough thing for kids to overcome these days! So, after a few dastardly efforts, I believe I’ve perfected a GFCF conversion of my favorite brownie recipe and my son enjoys getting the envious looks of the other children when he whips out the homemade brownie from his lunch bag at school! Oh, and they are half the sugar too!

gfcf Brownies

Mom’s Best GFCF Brownies (Nick Rating = 12 Thumbs Up!)

1 c vegetable shortening

1 c white sugar

1 c sugar alternative (Truvia, xylitol, etc)

2 tsp vanilla extract

4 eggs

3/4 c baking cocoa

1 c gluten-free all-purpose flour

1/2 tsp baking powder

1/4 tsp salt

Preheat oven to 350. Grease 13x9x2 inch baking pan. Mix shortening, sugars, vanilla. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each one. Add cocoa; beat until well blended. Add flour, baking powder, and salt; beat well. Pour batter into prepared pan (batter may be a bit stiff, but will spread out during baking process).

Bake 30-35 minutes, or until you can insert a toothpick and pull it out cleanly in middle of the pan. Cool completely and then cut into bars. Makes about 36 brownies.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

mini cookbook

Your Guide to Success with the GFCF Diet

Follow Me on Twitter

Error: Twitter did not respond. Please wait a few minutes and refresh this page.

Stockpiling Moms
%d bloggers like this: